Helpful Hints from The GAP:

Storage/Handling of COVID Vaccination Card

You’ve been vaccinated.  What should you do with your vaccine card?

  1. Photograph your record card

The first thing experts recommend once you’ve been vaccinated is taking a digital photograph of both sides of your personal record card. You can also scan the card and save the file on a laptop or desktop.

Do not share your personal proof of inoculation on Facebook or other social media sites, which could lead to identity theft because the CDC card includes a person’s date of birth as well as first name and last name. 

You may want to print a copy of the photo of the vaccination card and store it in your wallet. Some experts advise against having the original card laminated, so that booster shots of vaccine can be added if that becomes necessary. 

2) Leave the original at home

Make sure to store the original hard copy of your vaccine card someplace safe — you don’t need to keep it on your person at all times and risk losing it. Experts recommend keeping the original with other important documents or medical records and carrying just the digital copy.

Notify your primary care doctor that you’ve received the vaccine, as you would with any other inoculation. This helps health care providers to ensure your record of immunizations is up to date.

3) What happens if I lose it?

If you do lose your card, don’t panic. Every time a vaccine is administered, the provider records it with the state’s immunization registry. If you do misplace your vaccination card, you can request your immunization record by visiting theNew Jersey COVID-19 Information Hub.

4) No universal standard — yet

President Joe Biden’s chief medical adviser, Dr. Anthony Fauci, this week said the U.S. government will not mandate so-called vaccine passports for travel and other business activities. Anything resembling a digital pass is likely to be developed by the private sector, he added.

*Information provided by PSRC